Strengthening the Contractor-Distributor Connection

Strengthening the Contractor-Distributor Connection

Tips for a Profitable Partnership


As an irrigation contractor, one of the surest ways to enhance your bottom line – as well as your professional reputation – is to develop a solid and meaningful relationship with your distributor.

If you’re ready to make this partnership a priority, here are a few “don’ts” to keep in mind:

Don’t Be a Stranger

The pandemic showed us how to fall back on virtual meetings and transactions when personal interactions weren’t possible or prudent. Now that we’re moving past that stage, face-to-face meetings should re-emerge as the better way to cultivate mutually beneficial relationships with distributors.

Try to stop in periodically so they can make that personal connection. This conveys a clear message to your distributor that the relationship is important to you.

Keep communication candid and frequent. Suppliers often make decisions based on ongoing conversations with their customers. Create a process so that electronic communications in particular don’t get out of hand.

When Selecting
a Supplier

When first selecting a supply partner, keep in mind the three Ps: products, people and proximity.

  • Products – Make sure your distributor of choice carries the products and brands you prefer, and offers up-to-date and innovative solutions.
  • People – Gauge the knowledge level of the supplier’s employees. The staff should be well-informed and understand the challenges contractors face.
  • Proximity – Is the supplier located within a reasonable distance of your shop or job sites? You don’t want to waste valuable time running back and forth if you encounter a problem.

Along those same lines, be honest with your distributors about the size of your business. Don’t over- or under-sell it. Let them know how often you’ll need materials and what’s most important to achieve your business goals.

Don’t Sound False Alarms

If you sound a false alarm one too many times, you’ll get little to no response. For irrigation contractors, this means try not to expect immediate service from your distributor all the time. Reserve calling in favors for true emergencies.

Remember, your distributor is also juggling multiple priorities. He’s servicing hundreds of customers while also interfacing with manufacturers for required stock. You’ll make his life easier (and strengthen your partnership) if you don’t make every situation a rush request.

Don’t Be Afraid to Negotiate

Both you and your distributor must account for every penny. Once you understand how suppliers set price points, you can negotiate mutually beneficial terms (such as preferred product mix and delivery schedules) as well as costs. While it’s okay to purchase a few items online in the interest of cost savings, remember that solid distributor support will benefit your business more in the long run.

However, expecting a trifecta win of best price, best quality, and best service for every product you purchase from your supplier is unrealistic. Cash discounts and special account terms can be just as valuable as the best pricing, and they provide the added benefit of fostering a win-win relationship with your distributor.

If your business is too small to leverage steep product discounts, consider teaming up with a like-minded contractor so you too can enjoy the type of sales volume that qualifies for a discount.

Lastly, to minimize the risk of misunderstandings, put the result of your negotiations in writing.

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Don’t Hesitate to Ask for Help

While it’s important to negotiate your best deal, be sure to ask for help when needed.

Components are continually being redesigned to improve efficiency, and new releases are common. Suppliers are incentivized to stock and promote specific items, so they’ll be glad to hook you up with the latest and greatest products. Don’t hesitate to ask if your distributor offers training for you and your staff.

Occasionally, even highly reputable brands will fail in the field. When that happens to you, make sure your supplier is informed. He’s likely in a position to offer assistance. And if there’s truly an issue with a product, your distributor can go to bat for you with the manufacturer.

More Than Just Dollars and Cents

The makings of a great supplier relationship go well beyond pricing. Of course, you want the best price to get the job done. But professionalism and mutual respect run deeper. Contractors and distributors rely on each other for their very survival.

Prudent professionals on both sides of the counter will work to ensure this valuable association receives the attention it deserves.


Sources:
Featured Image: Adobe, License Granted
Landscape Management
Lighting & Irrigation

Help Your Customers Save Water During Fix a Leak Week

Help Your Customers Save Water During Fix a Leak Week

EPA’s Annual Event Runs from
March 14-20, 2022


Fighting water waste is part of every irrigation professional’s job description. This year’s Fix a Leak Week is a great time to remind your customers of your commitment to water efficiency.

Irrigation System Leaks

One small irrigation system leak — the thickness of a dime — can waste about 6,300 gallons of water each month! Advise your customers of the importance of the spring checkup. To ensure irrigation system components haven’t been damaged by frost or freezing weather, they should always be inspected prior to startup.

Fix a Leak Week

Become WaterSense Certified

If you’re not already WaterSense certified, you may want to consider the following exclusive benefits:

  • You’ll be included in the EPA’s online Directory of Certified Professionals.
  • You can receive work opportunities for new home projects, federal facilities, and LEED® projects.
  • You’ll be authorized to use the WaterSense label on your business cards and other promotional items.
  • You’ll enjoy increased exposure to potential customers through national EPA recognition as an environmental steward.
  • You’ll have access to EPA tools and other resources.

Interested? Click Here.

Are you WaterSense certified? (See sidebar at right.) If so, now’s the time to let your customers know that you’ve passed an EPA program specifically dedicated to improving water efficiency. So not only can you help identify and correct any irrigation system leaks, you can also ensure their system is performing optimally.

About 800 irrigation controllers and more than 340 spray sprinkler bodies have been certified by WaterSense for their water efficiency. It’s a good idea to carry an assortment of these products for your customers.

Other Household Leaks

Research has shown that the typical home wastes between 2,000 and 20,000 gallons of water per year due to leaks. Individually and collectively, the leaks in a single home can easily waste thousands of gallons of water every year, costing both the homeowner and the utility.

So during Fix a Leak Week, remind your customers to check for leaky faucets or showerheads, as well as malfunctioning toilets. This will demonstrate to them that you’re serious about water efficiency.

You can also provide them with some simple ways to pinpoint household leaks. Such as:

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Pinpointing Leaks

Check your household water usage during one of the colder months (January or February). If a family of four is using more than 12,000 gallons per month, there are some serious leaks.

Record the odometer-type number on your water meter. Then turn off all household water for two hours. Then check the meter again. If the number has changed at all, you’ve likely got a leak.

Identify toilet leaks by placing one drop of food coloring in the toilet tank. After 10 minutes, check the bowl. If there’s color in the bowl, you have a leak.

Some Simple Fixes

Many faucet leaks can be remedied by simply replacing worn-out washers and gaskets

Got a leaky toilet? Try replacing the flapper.

For a leaky showerhead, make sure there’s a tight connection between the fixture and the pipe stem. Then secure it with pipe tape (also called Teflon tape).

For more leak fixes, as well as online tutorials, check out the WaterSense website.


Sources:
Featured Image: Giphy.com
The Washington Post
Water Use It Wisely
Water News Network

 

Backflow Prevention Is Serious Business

Backflow Prevention Is Serious Business

Prevention Devices Have Got Your Back


The U.S. plumbing code is designed to ensure that the water delivered to an irrigation system never returns to the potable water supply. But without a backflow prevention device, problems can occur, such as the following chilling tale:

A Backflow Horror Story

In December of 2016, the city of Corpus Christi, Texas, received a dirty water complaint from a large asphalt producer. Despite flushing the property’s water main twice, residents reported a “white sudsy liquid” flowing from their taps.

Because the asphalt company had failed to install a backflow preventer on its water line, the corrosive chemical Indulin AA-86 was entering the line whenever water pressure on the property rose higher than the pressure in the main. This caustic emulsifying agent can burn eyes, skin and respiratory tracts. And 24 gallons of it had leaked into the water supply. Indulin AA-86 cannot be boiled out of tap water, so the city had to place a four-day ban on water usage until the emergency passed.

Degree of Hazard

“Degree of hazard” is a core concept in backflow terminology. It refers to the level of risk posed by a particular substance when it enters a water supply. An example of a low hazard would be food dye, which may be aesthetically unpleasant, but poses no threat to human health. Low hazard materials are also called “pollutants.”

Examples of high-hazard materials are motor oil, pesticides, fertilizers, and animal waste. These all pose a risk to human health, and are classified as “contaminants.”

Backflow incidents occur more often than you might think. That’s why an increasing number of municipalities are mandating the installation of backflow prevention devices – for residential as well as commercial properties.

Two Types of Backflow

There are two types of backflow incidents: backpressure and back-siphonage. Backpressure occurs whenever water pressure on a property becomes higher than the water pressure in the mains, forcing used water back into the system. Back-siphonage occurs whenever water pressure in the mains drops below that of the property, sucking non-potable water from the property’s water line and depositing it back into the mains.

Some backflow devices will prevent only one type of backflow, while others will prevent both.

A backflow incident involves three factors:

  1. A cross-connection between two water lines
  2. Hydraulic forces (either back-siphonage or backpressure
  3. A hazard, resulting in non-potable water.

Backflow Prevention Devices

While the public will be protected from any type of backflow device on a homeowner’s property, the homeowner himself will be protected by having a separate device for the irrigation system. Without it, the property owner could end up drinking toxins or water contaminated by bacteria.

The three most common backflow preventers are:

  • Pressure Vacuum Breaker (PVB) — the simplest and least expensive device; prevents back-siphonage only.
  • Double Check Valve Assembly (DCVA) – prevents both back-siphonage and backpressure; good for underground irrigation systems; not rated for conditions with a high degree of hazard.
  • Reduced pressure zone (RPZ) – most complex and expensive device; prevents both back-siphonage and backpressure; good for conditions with a high degree of hazard.

All of these devices work to protect the entire irrigation system. A fourth type of backflow device, the atmospheric vacuum breaker (AVB), is installed on each individual zone.

Become a Backflow Tester

The Ohio Plumbing Code requires that every backflow prevention device must be tested at least once a year. If you’re already installing these devices for your customers, why not go the extra mile and become a certified backflow tester? Backflow testing is a lucrative business, especially now with increased demand for greywater and rainwater collection systems.

Backflow Training Centers

Here are the locations of Ohio’s major backflow training centers:

Here’s the process for becoming a certified backflow tester in the state of Ohio:

  • Complete the Application for Backflow Tester Certification, provided by the Ohio Department of Commerce.
  • Locate a state-authorized backflow training facility. (See box at right.) You must complete about 35 to 40 hours of training and pass the practical exam before you can move on to the next step.
  • Pass the written exam, administered by the state of Ohio.
  • Once you pass the written exam, you will receive by mail a three-year certificate, and your name will be entered into the Ohio backflow testing database. After three years, you must be recertified.

Here’s how Sean Mullarkey, of TriState Water Works, explains the certification process:


Sources:
Featured Image: Adobe, License Granted
Irrigation & Green Industry
American Backflow Prevention Association
IrrigationRepair.com

Landscape Irrigation FAQs

Landscape Irrigation FAQs

Do You Have Ready Answers to These
Frequently Asked Questions?


Both customers and potential customers have a lot of questions when it comes to landscape irrigation systems. Here are some of the most common, along with our best answers.

Q: Why do I need an irrigation system? My area gets plenty of rain.

A: In Ohio, turf grass needs about an inch of water per week. So unless your property receives at least that much rain regularly each week, you probably need to irrigate. But nature doesn’t work that way. Even areas with rainy climates can experience dry periods. Your landscape can suffer damage after only a few days without water. You simply can’t count on annual rainfall to adequately meet your landscape’s needs.

Does Your Website
Need an FAQ Page?

Most digital marketing experts believe that an FAQ page can improve your website’s Search Engine Optimization (SEO) and also help convert first-time visitors into customers.

Here are three reasons why you may wish to consider adding an FAQ page to your site:

  • It improves user experience. Users looking for a quick answer to an easy question do not want to comb through pages of information. An FAQ page offers them a central place to find their answers. Be sure to keep answers concise and include links to more detailed information elsewhere on your website.
  • It helps establish customer trust. An FAQ page demonstrates to customers (and potential customers) that you are invested in helping them find solutions. It also helps to distinguish you as an authority within your industry, contributing to customer confidence.
  • It provides customer insight. By identifying common questions your customer may have, you’ll develop a deeper insight into their needs, desires and challenges.

Sources: Trajectory WebDesign, WebSolutions

But an irrigation system also prevents you from overwatering your landscape. Too much water can be harmful to your soil, drowning your plants, encouraging root rot and other diseases, and causing weeds to germinate. An irrigation system puts you in control of the amount of water used on your landscape.

In addition, irrigation systems support hydrozoning, the grouping of plants with similar water needs into irrigation zones. These zones not only encourage a healthy landscape, but they can save both water and money.

Q: Will I save money by installing my own irrigation system?

A: Perhaps, but only in the short term. A professional irrigation contractor has years of experience designing and installing the most cost-effective and efficient landscape irrigation systems. Most have received specialized training and certifications, and they utilize specialized equipment to significantly reduce installation time.

Most homeowners are not knowledgeable about the numerous factors that must be taken into account when designing and installing an irrigation system. Soil conditions, land grade, plant location and sun exposure all must be considered for proper installation. Are you proficient in PVC piping, valves, controllers, drip lines, sprinkler heads, and all the other system components? Probably not.

A properly designed and installed landscape irrigation system requires a professional in order to save money (and headaches) down the road.

Q: Why do I need to shut down my irrigation system for winter?

A: When water freezes, it expands. Irrigation system pipes are not buried beneath the frost line. If all of the water is not removed from your system’s pipes, valves, and sprinkler heads before the first deep freeze, your pipes will crack, resulting in costly repairs.  

Winterizing your system is a job best left to the professionals. Attempting to blow out your own sprinkler lines using an inadequate air compressor can result in water left in pipes. When this happens, you can expect freeze damage that must be repaired before spring startup.

Q: What’s the advantage of a smart irrigation system?

A: A smart irrigation system will you save you both time and money. Smart systems optimize your sprinkler run time. That means they always water at the right time of day for the right duration and according to weather conditions. They keep you from overwatering, which not only wastes water and money, but can damage plants.

With a smart system, you won’t have to make manual adjustments to your irrigation system due to unpredictable weather. A smart irrigation system can also shut itself down whenever a leak is detected.

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Q: Will I have to shut off my irrigation system when it rains?

A: Most irrigation contractors will recommend installation of a rain sensor. This device will automatically turn the irrigation system off whenever rainfall occurs. Once the rain ends, the sensor dries out and is reset. So, even if you’re away from home, your system knows what to do.

Q: How does a drip irrigation system compare to an above-ground sprinkler?

A: As opposed to sprinkler heads which spray a planted area above ground, drip systems soak the ground via tubes that are buried just below the surface. The emitters within the tubes slowly deliver water directly to the base of the plants.

Drip irrigation is ideal for landscape beds with plenty of plants and shrubs, as it can help reduce the risk of plant disease  associated with high levels of moisture. Drip lines can be incorporated as a separate zone within a larger overall sprinkler system.


Sources:
Featured Image: Pixabay
Lawn and Landscape
Landscape Management
Irrigation Tutorials

 

Six Common Irrigation Mistakes (and How to Avoid Them)

Six Common Irrigation Mistakes (and How to Avoid Them)

Save Water by Avoiding These Design and Installation Errors


To err is human. But that doesn’t mean some errors can’t be avoided. Irrigation mistakes often result in wasted water, and that reflects poorly on the industry.

Here are some of the most common missteps that can occur when designing and installing landscape irrigation systems.

#1. Mixing Sprinkler Head Types Within a Single Zone

Installing different types of irrigation heads within the same zone to operate at the same time is not a good idea. The precipitation / application rates of the various emitters used for rotors, sprays, bubblers, and drip systems are entirely different.

For instance, nozzles for rotor heads have a much lower IPH (inches per hour) rate than those for spray heads. So if you install a rotor head in a zone with spray heads, you’ll create a dry spot. Then, you’ll have to run this irrigation zone longer in order to apply enough water to cover the dry area, wasting both water and money.

#2. Setting the Same Running Times for All Zones

It’s important to program the irrigation controller so that the different zone types (rotor, spray, drip, etc.) have different running times. Again, because the precipitation rates differ for the various types of irrigation heads, the operating times should also be different. A zone with 0.20 IPH heads, for instance, will obviously need to run longer than an irrigation zone with 1.60 IPH heads.

Self-Assessment

According to the experts at Irrigation & Green Industry (IGIN) magazine, it’s a good idea for contractors to periodically assess their design and installation techniques in order to avoid irrigation mistakes. IGIN suggests asking yourself three questions:

  • Am I meeting — or exceeding – my customers’ expectations?
  • Am I doing so in such a way as to maximize my own profits?
  • Am I a responsible member of my community and setting a good example for the green industry?

Whenever the answer to any of these questions is “no,” it’s time to stop and reevaluate your methods.

#3. Failing to Achieve Head-to-Head Coverage

Regardless of whether you’re using sprays or rotors, all zones should provide head-to-head coverage. That means the maximum distance between heads/nozzles in each irrigation zone should match the nozzle manufacturer’s maximum throwing distance (10 feet, 15 feet, 25 feet, 35 feet, etc.) for that nozzle at your working pressure.

Do not attempt to increase the distance between heads in order to save on design, installation, operational or maintenance costs.

#4. Failing to Match Precipitation Rates

Some irrigation professionals incorrectly assume that they should use the same gallon per minute (GPM) nozzles in every head within a zone if they want to evenly water that area. Not so. There’s a reason system manufacturers produce so many different GPM nozzles.

By matching precipitation rates of the nozzles, you can save between 10 and 40 percent of the water used in any given zone. For instance, a rotor head that covers 1/3 of a circle should apply approximately 1/3 of the GPM as a rotor head in the same zone which covers a full circle. (For a more detailed explanation, see “Matched Precipitation Rates: Key to Water Efficiency.”)

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Common Lawn Sprinkler System Failures

#5. Incorporating Planting Beds in the Same Zone as Grassy Areas

Improper zoning is one of the most common irrigation mistakes. Grassy areas should always be irrigated separately from shrub and planting beds. Almost all landscape plants have larger root systems than grass. This means they can exist on half of the amount of water that grass requires. Separate shrub/planting zones should be scheduled to irrigate more deeply but less often as turf zones.

#6. Neglecting to Install or Retrofit Rain Sensors

A rain sensor may be a contractor’s most valuable tool for reducing water waste. (After all, irrigation should always be regarded as a back-up for natural precipitation, not the other way around.)

Since most rain sensors can save between three and 15 percent of a system’s annual operating expenses, they generally pay for themselves in less than one season. In fact, these devices are so effective that, in several areas of the country, they are required on all new irrigation systems.


Sources:
Featured Image: Adobe, License Granted
Sprinkler Warehouse
Irrigation & Green Industry
Lawn & Landscape